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2 edition of Radiation damage of the proton MEPED detector on POES (TIROS/NOAA) satellites found in the catalog.

Radiation damage of the proton MEPED detector on POES (TIROS/NOAA) satellites

Marina Galand

Radiation damage of the proton MEPED detector on POES (TIROS/NOAA) satellites

by Marina Galand

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Space Environment Center in Silver Spring, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite Program (U.S.),
  • Scientific satellites -- Deterioration.,
  • Solar radiation.,
  • Detectors -- Deterioration.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMarina Galand, D. Evans.
    SeriesNOAA technical report OAR ;, 456., SEC ;, 42, NOAA technical report OAR ;, 456., NOAA technical report OAR., 42.
    ContributionsEvans, David.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTL798.S3 G35 2000
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 24 p. :
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6833086M
    LC Control Number00327328

    In this paper we present quantified estimates of the degree of radiation damage for all NOAA/POES satellites, a method for correcting the MEPED proton measurements, and give an estimate of. Observations of the low-altitude, charged particle environment observed by the POES and Metop SEM-2 Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instrument for events E1–E3 are shown in Fig. 3. Highly inclined LEO spacecraft pass through the horns of the radiation belts, a regime rich with energetic protons and electrons, several times.

    The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (NOAA POES) is known to degrade with time. The particle radiation detectors (PRD) on board CBERS-1 and CBERS-2 made great contribution to understanding of the space environment. A Monte Carlo Simulation of the NOAA POES MEPED Proton.

    Meped definition at , a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation; MEPED medium energy proton and electron detector. The medium energy proton and electron detector (MEPED) measured protons in five energy ranges from 30 keV to >60 MeV; electrons ab , and keV.   We have used observations from the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instrument and a first principles model of charge accumulation [11] to develop estimates of electron internal charge (IC) accumulation over the lifetime of each POES and Metop spacecraft for a range of typical discharge time constants.


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Radiation damage of the proton MEPED detector on POES (TIROS/NOAA) satellites by Marina Galand Download PDF EPUB FB2

QC U66 no NOAA Technical Report OAR SEC 42 RADIATION DAMAGE OFTHE PROTON MEPED DETECTOR ON POES (TIROS/NOAA) SATELLITES M. Galand D. Evans February U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. distribution was expected to be isotropic or near isotropic, the proton intensities at small pitch angles often exceeded those near 90∘, which is highly unlikely for energies above 30 keV.

GalandandEvans [] stud-ied the degradation of the MEPED proton detectors, and. For over 30 years the NOAA/POES satellites have collected valuable information about the particle environment in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. However, with time these solid state detectors suffer from radiation damage due to energetic particles, which leads to increasing energy thresholds and increasing underestimation of particle Cited by: 3.

the radiation damage experienced by the silicon solid state proton detectors, which are part of the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NOAA POES are low Earth orbiting satellites with an. [8] The MEPED proton detectors have been observed to degrade over time due to radiation damage, which has led to erroneous fluxes and artificial long-term trends in the data [GalandandEvans,;McFaddenet al.,;Asikainen and Mursula, ].

In AM we made a quantitative analysis of the effects of radiation damage on the MEPEDCited by: The MEPED instruments on board the NOAA POES and MetOp satellites have been continuously measuring energetic particles in the magnetosphere since However, degradation of the proton detectors over time leads to an increase in the energy thresholds of the instrument and imposes great challenges to studies of long-term variability in the near-Earth space environment as well as a general.

pitating into the atmosphere (Nesse Tyssøy et al., ; Rodger et al., ). As one of the few detectors, the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites RESEARCH ARTICLE /JA Key.

The SEM/2 consists of two separate sensor units and a common Data Processing Unit (DPU). The sensor units are the Total Energy Detector (TED) and the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED).

The DPU serves as the interface between the sensors and the spacecraft. Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED). This sensitivity has recently been used to identify relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts, but has heretofore remained unquantified.

Monte Carlo simulations of the proton and electron telescopes were performed using the Geant4 code, and we derive the characteristic response of each. The NOAA/POES satellites have operated with almost identical instrumentation for more than 30 years and have collected valuable information about the particle environment in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere.

The investigation of long-term trends and multi-satellite studies using NOAA/POES satellites involves a number of challenges. The solid state detectors used in the MEPED instrument. We investigate the degradation of the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) with respect to isolated events that severely accelerate the detector degradation.

It is known that the proton detectors of the MEPED instrument are subjected over time to radiation damage. This is manifested with an increase in the energy. Key words.

Proton detector degradation – Space Weather – Calibration – MEPED – NOAA POES 1. Introduction The space environment around the Earth is harsh, and instru-ments and satellites in orbit can be harmed if exposed to the strong radiation (see e.g.

Horne et al. Here, we study the radiation damage experienced by the silicon. 2 POES MEPED Instrument. The POES MEPED instrument used in this work is part of SEM‐2 and is described by EG00 and Green. The MEPED instrument has two proton telescopes and two electron telescopes.

One telescope of each particle type is grouped as the 0° detectors, and another set is grouped as the 90° detectors. Since the NOAA/POES satellites have continuously monitored energetic particles with the MEPED instrument. After some years of operation, the particle detectors become degraded due to radiation damage.

Fortunately, both new and older satellites are operational at the same time. By comparing the monthly averaged proton energy spectra from a newly launched satellite with all the older. Effects of the radiation damage on MEPED The MEPED electron and proton detectors are typ-ical solid state silicon detectors based on pulse-height analysis.

In such a detector a charged particle pene-trating the detector chip loses some or all of its kinetic energy and produces free charge carriers (electrons and holes) in the silicon lattice.

The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED), aboard the polar-orbiting, low-altitude, POES (Polar Operational Environmental Satellite) and measuring protons in the 30 keV-6 MeV energy range, undergoes damage over time. back detector shows increased counts due to noise from mid Simultaneously the front detector counts decrease relative to the 90o telescope We rescale the front detector counts to proper level, i.e., from red to green.

SUMMARY • NOAA/MEPED proton detectors suffer from radiation damage which increases the effective energy. Observations of the low-altitude, charged particle environment observed by the POES and Metop SEM-2 Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instrument for events E1–E3 are shown in Fig.

inclined LEO spacecraft pass through the horns of the radiation belts, a regime rich with energetic protons and electrons, several times per day. [1] The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instruments onboard the NOAA/POES satellites have provided a valuable long-term database of low-altitude energetic particle observations spanning from to present.

Here we study the instrumental problems of the NOAA/MEPED electron detectors and present methods to correct them. Figure 2. Proton counts in the lowest channel (≥16MeV) of the POES omni-directional detectors on NOAA over six-hr periods. Also shown are the L-values at the satellite. (a) Data from a quiet period (1 January ) showing background counts due to GCRs as well as peaks from the SAA and a temporary proton radiation belt.

The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instruments onboard the NOAA/POES satellites have provided a valuable long-term database of low-altitude energetic particle observations. The Figure displays twelve interpolated multi satellite plots from P P P MetOp and POES 19 from the Southern Hemisphere during the March storm.

The color coded MLT/ILAT plots shows 30–80 keV proton flux from the 9 0 ∘ detector (upper panels) and from the 0 ∘ detector (lower panels).quantitative analysis of the effect of radiation damage on the MEPED proton detectors and presented a new method to recali-brate the fluxes of all NOAA/POES satellites (Asikainen and Mursula, ).

We showed that, typically, the data in the begin-ning of the operational period .